whitesnake aldrich 2

Frontiers

Following a lengthy five year hiatus, Whitesnake fans celebrated when in 2002, lead vocalist David Coverdale announced a reformation of the iconic rock group for their then-forthcoming 25th Anniversary. Rejoining the lineup was veteran drummer Tommy Aldridge, alongside the well-welcomed new additions of guitarist Reb Beach from Winger, bassist Marco Mendoza of Thin Lizzy, former Eagles keyboardist Timothy Drury, and acclaimed guitar virtuoso Doug Aldrich.

Upon entering the Whitesnake lineup, Aldrich had previously compiled an impressive resume which included pivotal tenures behind such artists as Dio, House of Lords, and Hurricane. Not dismissing Beach’s notable contributions to Whitesnake, however a formidable songwriting chemistry quickly developed between Aldrich and Coverdale, which ultimately led to the band’s 2008 comeback album, ‘Good to Be Bad,’ and the acclaimed 2011 follow-up, ‘Forevermore.’

Both of these ventures showcased a bold revisiting of the classic Whitesnake approach, whilst dedicated listeners praised the comparisons between that of Aldrich and predecessor John Sykes. In light of Doug Aldrich’s recent departure from Whitesnake, we run through ten of his most memorable contributions to the band.

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10) “‘Til the End of Time”

From ‘Good to Be Bad’ (2008)

We begin our rundown with the closing selection from ‘Good to Be Bad.’ The song’s choice fusing of blues-laden acoustic chord progressions and melodic group vocals attribute a melancholic quality which reminds the listener of David Coverdale’s previous collaborations with Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page. “I will love you ’till the end of time,” Coverdale echos above the delicate string arrangements which concludes Whitesnake’s first studio album in nearly a decade.

 

 

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9) “I Need You (Shine a Light)”

From ‘Forevermore’ (2011)

Authoritative distortion guitar reminiscent of that from 1987’s ‘Whitesnake’ welcome the listener to “I Need You (Shine a Light).” The song’s anthemic overtones brings us back to the band’s Adrian Vandenberg period, where significant emphasis was positioned towards radio-friendly choruses while retaining a generous portion of the favored, guitar-oriented Whitesnake sound.

 

 

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8) “All for Love”

From ‘Good to Be Bad’ (2008)

Another proud achievement surfaced in the form of “All for Love,” which implemented a perplexing re-installment of the ‘Slide It In’ sound. Aldrich particularly takes command with a charismatic chord pattern during the song’s bridge, while Coverdale is found contemplating past actions performed with the intention of winning over his love interest. This is soon followed with an energetic solo which serves as the icing on this auditory cake first batched up decades prior.

 

 

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7) “Love & Treat Me Right”

From ‘Good to Be Bad’ (2008)

“Love & Treat Me Right” boasts a moderately heavier take on the familiar Whitesnake sound, however due to the track’s sing-along vocal harmonies and expansive guitar work which introduces the noticeable implementing of natural harmonics, the outcome remains in comfortable territory while also demonstrating a contented Aldrich placing his own stamp on the piece.

 

 

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6) “Best Years”

From ‘Good to Be Bad’ (2008)

Perhaps recollecting upon the band’s past endeavors, “Best Years” has the members of Whitesnake describing the present as being the best years of their lives, and it’s hard to argue with such a statement based upon the solid performance presented here on this representative opener from ‘Good to Be Bad.’

 

 

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5) “Tell Me How”

From ‘Forevermore’ (2011)

The slight introduction of synthesizers attribute towards the formidable attitude showcased throughout another proud example off of ‘Forevermore,’ however this time it’s the exemplary “Tell Me How” which alongside an applaudable guitar solo shows Coverdale attempting (successfully, might we add) to reproduce the same ranging high notes which previously decorated what is widely considered to be the band’s definitive power ballad, “Still of the Night.”

 

 

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4) “Steal Your Heart Away”

From ‘Forevermore’ (2011)

An impressive guitar solo contribution rounds out the harmonica-bolstered “Steal Your Heart Away,” which is perhaps best described as a modern adaption of the ‘Saints & Sinners’ sound further expanded by concrete musicianship and traditional blues rock instrumentation.

 

 

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3) “Can You Hear the Wind Blow”

From ‘Good to Be Bad’ (2008)

Hard hitting chord progressions are moderately submerged beneath a depth of atmospheric synthesizers, before triumphantly reaching out towards the surface during the chorus of “Can You Hear the Wind Blow,” which serves as this sophomore track off of ‘Good to Be Bad.’ Once again, Aldrich steps forward as a combative guitarist while pairing off with Reb Beach during the song’s multiple pick-grinding solos.

 

 

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2) “Love Will Set You Free”

From ‘Forevermore’ (2011)

Doug Aldrich reaches his monumental stride on the ‘Forevermore’ staple “Love Will Set You Free.” The assertive side of the Aldrich/Coverdale songwriting chemistry is at it’s highest, with accelerating guitar work and a mesmerizing chorus forming a modern day Whitesnake classic destined to remain forever installed in the band’s live set list.

 

 

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1) “Forevermore”

From ‘Forevermore’ (2011)

Appropriately serving as the final magnum opus of the Doug Aldrich-era as well as our countdown of the Top 10 Doug Aldrich Whitesnake Songs is the seven minute acoustic epic, “Forevermore.” What begins as a second installment of “Sailing Ships” impressively evolves into a climatic and engaging rock anthem around the three minute mark, which is re-centered upon the marvel guitar work of Aldrich as well as the song’s heartrending string arrangements.